snickerdoodles (a history lesson)

Sep
2012
14

posted by on baking, Denver, high altitude, homemade, Phoenix

3 comments

Out of curiosity, I wanted to know the history of the snickerdoodle. I can’t remember the first time I tried one, but if I could only take one cookie with me should I ever get stranded on a desert island, it would be the snickerdoodle.

Many sources say that the word snickerdoodle may have come from the German word “schneckennudeln,” which directly translates to “snail noodles”. Go and Google that word and pictures of  cinnamon pinwheel pastries that resemble snails come up.

The recipe I have for snickerdoodles is one I used while I lived in Denver and it held up beautifully at the high altitude. I made them a couple of nights ago, here in Phoenix, and they were just as cakey & sweet as ever. Mine don’t turn out as flat as other recipes, but I like that when you bite into them, there’s a slight crunch from the sugar and cinnamon on the outside and the inside is soft, moist and tender from the cream of tartar.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1½ cups sugar
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 tablespoons sugar & 2 teaspoons cinnamon (to roll the dough in)
  • 2 eggs
  • 2¾ cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  1. Combine the softened butter and sugar with a mixer until light and fluffy.
  2. Blend in the vanilla & eggs and mix until well combined.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda & salt.
  4. Pour the dry ingredients a little at a time into the wet mixture and blend with a mixer well after each addition. You may have to finish mixing the dough with a wooden spoon, it will be thick!
  5. Shape the dough into 1″ balls and roll in the sugar and cinnamon mixture. (These don’t flatten out a whole lot, so you should be able to fit a dozen on a baking sheet with no problem)
  6. Bake in a 400 degree oven for about 8 minutes. The tops will be cracked and slightly golden. Remove from the oven and let the cookies cool on a wire rack.
  7. Keep the snickerdoodles in an airtight container to keep the insides moist! *these also keep well in the freezer if you roll the dough into balls, freeze on a flat sheet and store in freezer bags for later use.*

 

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3 comments

  1. Susan
    • meg

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